sagame66


For those of you who don’t know me, I am a 68-year old amateur part-time tournament player.  I began playing tournament poker in earnest in the 1990’s and even though my family life and full time job as a lawyer left me time to play only a dozen tournaments a year, I had just begun to enjoy some modest success when the internet poker boom hit. 
As the number of players exploded, and the ranks of tournament players swelled with online wizards like Jonathan whose styles of play were clearly superior to the self-taught “by the book” style of play I had learned from the old guard, I realized that I had to do something to adapt.  Fortunately I found my way to Jonathan.  With the help of his coaching I totally revamped my game, and have managed to remain somewhat competitive despite the ravages of advancing age.
Nonetheless, my priorities still remain my wife, my children, my grandchildren and my clients.  Poker is a recreational hobby.  While the main attraction for me is the competition across the green felt, part of what I enjoy about tournament poker is the dramatic difference between the colorful people and unpredictable events I experience in poker as compared with those I encounter in my life as a buttoned down lawyer.
Two examples from the 2014 World Series of Poker may seem like everyday occurrences to poker players, but I assure you things like this never happen in law firm conference rooms.
On Day 2 of the Main Event, the following rather embarrassing situation arose.
Reading physical tells is not one of the strengths of my game.  I am wrong as often as I am right.  Hence I don’t usually rely on tells when I make big decisions for a lot of chips.  But I know that a lot of players do.  So I have worked at controlling my own unconscious tells, and sometimes I employ false tells when I have a big hand and want someone to think I am bluffing.
To control my tells, I have adopted a standard series of movements whenever I bet.  I pick up my chips in the same manner each time, move them forward in the same manner and at the same speed each time, bring my hands back the same way each time, and adopt the same relaxed, restful pose each time (with my chin resting on one fist and the other arm resting on the table).  I can stay in that position for many minutes without getting uncomfortable, no matter how stressed and nervous I am inside.
I wear mirrored sunglasses (Blue Sharks of course) to hide my eyes, in case I am blinking faster than usual from nervousness or in case I need to close them in order to relax.  I pick a small spot on the table in front of me, focus on that single spot, and begin meditation-style deep breathing in order to control my pulse and respiration rate.  I do breathing exercises at home daily, and by now I can maintain that deep breathing without moving a muscle for 5 minutes or more.  Most important, I do all of this EVERY time I make a bet, large or small, strong or weak, bluff or not.  So my opponents can’t correlate it to a particular type of situation.
Against weak and unskilled opponents none of this is necessary, and I don’t bother with some of it (like the sunglasses). But when I am up against strong opponents, I need to use it all.
A few hours into Day 2 one of the players to my left was eliminated and another player was moved into the vacant seat.  I recognized him immediately as “Mad Marvin” Rettenmaier, a young German pro who had been tearing up the tournament circuit during the previous 18 months.
My intention was to try to avoid playing pots against him, especially since he was on my left and would have position on me most of the time.  But I was so card dead that I had very little choice about whom to play against.  The few times I picked up a playable hand I had to play it, regardless of who else was in the pot.  And because he had a huge stack of chips, and was clearly the best player at the table, Marvin was playing  almost every hand, figuring (correctly) that no one would relish taking him on unless they had a really strong hand.  Since strong hands don’t come along that often, he picked up pot after pot by betting relentlessly and getting people to fold.  When someone played back at him, he either folded or re-raised and put them to the test.
At one point, after folding junk hands for an hour and watching my stack dwindle as I paid the blinds and antes patiently waiting for a good hand, I finally picked up A-Q.  I raised.  Marvin re-raised.  Did he really have a better hand, or was he just testing the conservative amateur player with a small stack who probably would not want to risk busting out unless he had a really strong hand?
I decided the latter was at least as likely as the former, so I made a sizeable re-raise, putting nearly half my stack at risk.  Given my cautious, conservative table image, I figured he would have to give me credit for A-A, K-K or A-K and would not call unless he had A-A or K-K – a small portion of the total range of hands with which he might 3-bet.
I adopted my standard statue pose, stared at the spot in front of me, and started deep breathing and counting down from 100.  I couldn’t secretly look as him as he was to my left and I would have had to turn my head.  I was not going to give him ANY information to help him figure out whether I had the hand I was representing or was bluffing.
So I sat like a statue, staring at a spot on the table and deep breathing.  As the minutes ticked on, I thought it was a good omen that he was taking so long.  If he had
A-A he would have called (or raised) immediately.  And with K-K he would have called fairly quickly.  With less, I thought he would ultimately fold.
It felt like the game you played with your friends as a kid, where you would stare at each other silently and whoever broke first and started giggling lost.  I was determined not to let him break me no matter how long he stalled.  I was prepared to sit there deep breathing all day if I had to.
Eventually, after what someone later claimed was 14 minutes, the dealer said “The action is on you Sir”.  Well, he wasn’t calling 30-year old Marvin “Sir”.  He had to mean me.  I looked up and the whole table was looking at me.
It turned out that Marvin had slid a big stack of 5,000 chips forward (silently) after only about a minute of thought, and the rest of the time everyone was waiting for me to act on his re-raise!  Needless to say I was embarrassed.  I apologized to everyone, and told them I had no idea he had acted, that I was waiting for him to make a decision about whether to call my raise.  In the end I folded and he showed me Q-Q.
It was a great play on his part, which is why you don’t try to put a play on a world class player like Marvin if you have any sense.  It was actually a decent play on my part in the abstract (in my opinion) and was calculated to succeed against everyone except either a bad player (who is not skillful enough to fold a strong hand like Q-Q in the face of information indicating the hand is beaten) or a great player (like Marvin).  He later told me he did consider folding.  (At least I made him think about it.)
Needless the say, I got teased the rest of the day.  Every time it was my turn to act, someone would say something like “Wake up Ken, action is on you”.  One guy said “I couldn’t decide whether you were asleep or had had a heart attack”.  It was all in good fun but it was embarrassing nonetheless.  Next time I will show him A-A and double up at his expense!
The other entertaining encounter I had was in the $1,000 No Limit Holdem event a week before the Main Event.
I was in seat 7 and at one point the player in seat 9 was eliminated. After a while the empty seat was filled by a player who arrived draped in a colorful flag of a country I didn’t recognize.
The World Cup soccer matches were being shown on giant screens throughout the huge ballroom in which the tournament was held, so it wasn’t unusual to see players decked out in gear reflecting the country they supported.
I asked him what flag he was wearing, and it became apparent that his English wasn’t good enough to understand what I was asking.  Since my Spanish was equally deficient, I turned to the player in seat 10, who was from Colombia and whose English was quite good, and asked him to help.  He inquired of Seat 9 in Spanish, and then informed me that Seat 9 was from Uruguay.
Uruguay’s soccer team had made headlines earlier in the week during a match against Italy, when one of Uruguay’s players bit an opposing player during a heated on-field encounter.
I asked Seat 10 to ask Seat 9 (in Spanish) on my behalf, “If I beat you in a pot, please don’t bite me.”  Seat 10 looked at me with wide eyes and said, “I’m not going to tell him that.”
So I opened up my iPad, fired up Google Translate, set it for English to Spanish, and typed in “If I beat you in a poker hand, please don’t bite me.”  Immediately in the window below, the words popped up “Si te gano en una mano de poquer por favor no me muerda.”  I handed the iPad to Seat 9.  He read the Spanish, looked at me, and (drum roll….) laughed his head off.  We fist bumped and moved on.
Thank you Jonathan, for inviting me to share a few of my “tales from the felt”.  Any time you want more, just let me know.  I have lots of them stored up from the past 25 years.The post Guest Blog Post: Ken Adams first appeared on Jonathan Little. .

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By Dr. Tricia Cardner
Are you your own worst enemy at the poker table? Have you ever made a final table with a large stack only to make a series of silly mistakes to blow the chip lead and end up with a disappointing finish? Or perhaps you have a goal to create a stringent study plan, but it never gets under way. These are a couple of common examples of how we can undermine our own best interests in mundane and often unconscious ways. Of course, some players engage in dramatic self-sabotage. Consider the case of Stu Ungar.
Stu was arguably one of the best gamesmen who ever lived and if you don’t know his story, I’d encourage you to read One of A Kind: The Rise and Fall of Stuey, “The Kid” Ungar. He engaged in self-sabotage at an extreme level (including plenty of drugs and reckless gambling), and while most of us won’t fall to those depths, most poker players do engage in small acts of self-sabotage.Consider this common sense definition of self-sabotage offered by Alyce Cornyn-Selby, “Self-sabotage is when we say we want something and then go about making sure it doesn’t happen.”
Even those who play the highest stakes often exhibit minor emotional difficulties that decrease their profitability. These difficulties include emotions like fear or guilt that are by and large irrational and outside of conscious awareness. Irrational thinking plays a role in supporting our self-sabotage, too. The problem is that players seldom mean to sabotage themselves. We don’t generally make a conscious decision to spoil things – and that’s a problem. We can be left with the feeling: “Why did I do that?”
Let’s take a look at irrational self-talk – the basis of most self-sabotage. If you’ve ever thought things like “there’s no way I’ll win this tournament” or “poker math is too hard for someone like me to learn”, then you’ve engaged in negative self-talk. What we subconsciously tell ourselves is a strong determinant of how far we will go in this game. What we say to ourselves leads directly to our feelings about our chances for success. People often erroneously believe that feelings lead to thoughts, but it’s actually the other way around. Keep an eye on any irrational self-talk and do what you can to reduce it.
Fear is a predominant emotion that surrounds less than stellar results. The two main categories of fear are: fear or success and fear of failure. Most people deny fearing success; after all, who doesn’t want to be successful? But with a little digging, you might find it.
Generally speaking, fear of success is the result of messages we picked up as a child. If you heard adults denigrate the rich as “crooks” or if you were told to not get “too big for your britches”, then you might have unconscious fears of success. There is a strong tendency to internalize the attitudes that were directed towards us by our parents or other important caregivers.
You might even fear increased levels of responsibility that come with higher earnings like being responsible for taxes or supporting family members. These can be tremendous emotional weights and it is human nature to do what we have to in order to alleviate real or imagined pressure. Keep an eye out for fear of success. Observing yourself and becoming aware of such tendencies is the first step in containing the fear.
Fear of failure is like the opposite side of the coin. If we have a deep down fear that we can’t be successful, we’ll often set up conditions so that we won’t be successful. We may say to ourselves (and others), “I could be the greatest poker player of all time if I had the time to devote to the game.” Procrastination on studying then becomes our built in “excuse” for why we aren’t more successful. If you think that you’re too old, too young, too (fill in the blank) to be good at poker, then you are likely to have an irrational fear of failure and it is likely holding you back. Again, the key is to become aware of these tendencies in yourself so that you can take active steps to putting a stop to them.
As author Elizabeth Gilbert put it, “You need to learn how to select your thoughts just the same way you select your clothes every day. This is a power you can cultivate. If you want to control things in your life, work on the mind. That’s the only thing you should be trying to control.”Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to observe yourself to see if you are engaging in irrational thinking that is the causing you to shoot yourself in the foot. With some careful attention, it is possible to stop engaging in these behaviors.
Dr. Tricia Cardner is the author of Positive Poker with Jonathan Little, available in paperback, audio, and e-book formats. (You can get the audio version for free!) She also co-hosts The Mindset Advantage Podcast with Elliot Roe, available for free on iTunes, and you can follow her on Twitter @DrTriciaCardner.

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By Ken Adams:
How do you prepare for playing in the WSOP Main Event?  Everyone has their own ideas about what you can do to increase your chances of making a deep run.  If you think you can’t learn anything useful by studying Jamie Gold’s successful championship run in 2006, you are mistaken.   Whatever your opinion of Jamie’s poker skills, you would do well to copy his habit of snacking on blueberries throughout the long tournament days.
Your brain requires an enormous amount of energy.  And the fuel it consumes is glucose.  When it gets low on glucose, mental fatigue sets in.  When that happens, the speed and accuracy of your decision-making decreases.  So does your patience and self-control.
If you want to see some amazing proof of how mental fatigue reduces self discipline and decision-making ability, check out “Will Power; Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength” by Roy Baumeister, a research psychologist.  The book describes dozens of research projects like the classic marshmallow test, first done 50 years ago at Stanford University.  A child was seated at a table.  A marshmallow was placed on the table.  The child was told (s)he could eat the marshmallow any time (s)he wanted.  But if (s)he waited three minutes until the timer went off, (s)he could have two marshmallows.  Some children ate the marshmallow almost immediately.  Others struggled for a while but ended up eating it before the alarm went off.  Some succeeded in waiting the entire three minutes and were rewarded.  The latter group were then given a series of increasingly difficult puzzles to do, designed to create mental fatigue and frustration. Then they were given the marshmallow test again.  Almost none had the patience and self control to wait three minutes again before eating the marshmallow.
As time progressed, brain scanning technology gave neuroscientists the ability to observe changes within the brain during experiments like these.  They found that both physical and mental exertion reduce blood sugar, causing physical and mental fatigue including reduced patience, self discipline and decision-making ability.
Lest you think that playing in the WSOP Main Event does not cause mental fatigue, read the chapter in Baumeister’s book on “decision fatigue”.  He describes research experiments involving common consumer purchases like buying a car (which color do you want? Which engine? Which interior package? Etc. etc. etc.) or ordering a custom-made suit (which fabric? Solid, striped or plaid? Cuffs or plain?  Pleated or not?  Break or no break?  Single vent, double or none?  Three button or two?  Etc.)  Consistently, as the number of decisions and choices multiplies, the consumer’s patience declines and in the end, (s)he ends up deferring to whatever the salesman recommends.  That is why skilled car salesmen leave the most expensive options to last.  Experiments have shown that having to make a large number of decisions under time pressure consumes energy (glucose) and increases brain fatigue.
During the Main Event you will play five two-hour levels per day.  Assuming an average of four orbits per hour, you will be dealt about 400 hands.  Assuming you fold 300 of them before the flop, another 40 after the flop, and 40 after the turn, (with multiple betting decisions on some rounds), each day you will have to make at least 750 decisions whether to fold, call or raise (and if raise, how much), each in less than 60 seconds.  What can you do to reduce the extent to which fatigue (a) impairs the quality of your decision-making toward the end of the tournament day, and (b) reduces your self-discipline (making you more vulnerable to tilt)?
As documented in the research summarized in Baumeister’s book, the two most effective ways to counteract those effects are with sleep and glucose.  Since there is not much opportunity to sleep during the tournament day, the only option is to pay attention to your glucose (blood sugar) level.  You might think that the thing to do is eat candy, or swallow glucose tablets.  But quick hits of glucose to the brain produce short-lasting spikes of energy, followed by crashes, which is NOT what you need.  Instead, you want to maintain a steady intake of slower metabolizing sources of glucose, of which fruit and nuts are among the best examples.  Blueberries happen to be one of the best, according to Baumeister.  Which brings us back to Jamie Gold.
So if you want to emulate Jamie Gold’s 2006 results, get plenty of sleep each night and snack on blueberries during the day.  If you don’t win the tournament, at least it won’t be because your brain didn’t have enough energy to make good decisions.

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Lessons I’ve Learned at the World Championship
by Jennifer Shahade
The two-time US women’s chess champion, and PokerStars Mind Sports Ambassador Jennifer Shahade admits that her biggest highlight of this poker season was winning the TonyBet Open Face Chinese World Championship High Roller event. Not only was it the biggest live buy-in she ever played, it was also the biggest cash prize of her career.
Since the event was streamed live, the recorded video footage allowed Jennifer to analyze her own game and use it to teach others about OFC poker. In this piece Jennifer shares her thoughts on two hands she played during the tournament and looks at them in more detail.

At this point of the tournament I had Jason Mercier and Marek Kolk as my opponents. Jason is a really good player under pressure, he has a lot of experience. In Open Face Chinese I think he plays a bit more conservatively than average. Jason is also extremely dangerous under new formats and new situations, as he can adjust very quickly, being used to that from high stakes mixed games.
So considering many of the players were not as used to tournament format that could give Jason an edge. I didn’t know as much about Marek Kolk though from the few hands I played with him, he seemed more on the aggressive side and willing to take risks when it’s close, so he and Jason were presenting two very different aspects of the game here.
Just like in other forms of poker, sometimes a more conservative line and a more aggressive line can have similar equity, so in Open Face it’s about trying to figure out when your style is interfering with the correct mathematical choice. I’m not sure where I lie on the spectrum – I think I’m pretty good, of course. Though if I had to identify a leak in this respect, I’d say I am probably a bit too conservative/straightforward when my hand is bad.
When talking about this particular hand, I definitely would have played Queen on top, 2, 3 in the middle and 7, 4 in the back first to act, as Marek did. I can’t see another way to set my hand: 2, 4 in the middle and J, 5, 5 at the bottom seems totally standard, the jack is the perfect kicker for the back.
As for Jason’s hand, anyone who watches my Run It Once videos knows how partial I am to pairs over three-flushes. With all of the kings, tens and sixes live, I’d consider K, K, 6 in the back, ten in the middle and ace up top. Believe it or not we are over 50% to make a boat or quads in this spot, which sounds outrageous, but makes sense when you consider how it’s rather unusual that all of our kings and kickers are live.
It’s also very nice that our other kicker is so live too so we’ll make two pair in the middle quite comfortably. Of course his set is very well designed for fantasyland, though I think my way gets there quite often as well.
I think Marek’s hand was shaping up poorly compared to our hands. Presumably, he did not get a diamond, and Jason was very likely to complete his flush. Meanwhile, all my jacks and fives were live too, and there were still three aces live at the time, so he decided it was time to gamble.
I think I’d play it the same way though I don’t know his discard on the crucial pull where he decided to gamble for Fantasy Land.
I think the value of Fantasy Land is slightly less in three-handed play. As I discuss in my Run It Once videos, however, I think that in three-handed it’s also a little easier to get to it because we will have more information about which kickers will be live and which will be dead.
Whether or not to go for Fantasy late in the game is often a pure math problem! It became a bit more complex in the tournament format with short stacks though I normally believed that if I had a relatively short stack, it was even more profitable to gamble for Fantasy.
It’s also very relevant as to which position we’ll be in when we come out of Fantasy Land. It’s not that important to see our opponent’s first five cards when we set a Fantasy hand, it will only occasionally change our set. However, it’s quite important if we can find ourselves on the button after getting out of Fantasy, rather than “wasting” our button while we are in Fantasy.
A very important factor to consider before playing a live Open Face Chinese poker event is one’s physical and mental preparation. Because you have to play each and every hand, it is very different from Hold’em tournaments.
I had an event in London the day before the OFC High Roller, and I wasn’t confident that I’d be rested enough to play the 10K High Roller. I ended up changing my seat from an aisle to a window the night before, and slept the entire flight. If not for that, maybe I wouldn’t have ended up playing and taking home the biggest cash of my career and the belt!
I was so energized to be in beautiful Prague, and just before sundown, I texted my friend Warren Lush to see what he was up to and how the High Roller was going. He encouraged me to come out and play and I rushed to the tournament. All in all, a great example of the butterfly effect for me.
I also had a wonderful time at the tournament – I’d never played a so-called “High Roller” before, though I’d played 10Ks in Main Events, this was quite different. I noticed that ironically, the atmosphere was more informal and relaxed. I also thought the staff did an exceptional job, especially considering how late the tournament ran. And the food was amazing at Kings Casino, I’ll always remember the steak and champagne I had after winning. I’m missing Prague already!

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By James Iglinsky
Since 2010, I have been traveling to Las Vegas from Houston to play in a WSOP event. I don’t get the opportunity to play much, as the closest casino game is 2.5 hours away and I will not play in any of the local raked home games.
Leading up to this year’s WSOP trip, I began a heavy study schedule watching videos and playing hand packs from InstaPoker. Then I joined Jonathan Little’s online training site, floattheturn.com. I enjoyed his teaching style and how easy his content is to read and understand. In one article Jonathan explained how Tim Ferris significantly influenced his life when he began following Tim’s Four Hour Body program and changed his eating habits. One of my goals this year was to lose weight and become healthier so it seemed like a good fit.  I picked up a copy of the Four Hour Body and am happy to say that, for me, it has been really easy to follow and I have now lost 21 pounds in 35 days. I believe this played some part in my ability to focus during the Colossus as my memory has improved and I was never exhausted.
From my previous experiences in the WSOP I knew that I would be forced into some difficult decisions early, and I was not disappointed. Jonathan Little’s videos allowed me to be more aggressive in position against weak blinds, to fold AQ, and to even 3-bet and take down a few uncontested pots. I would like to provide links to the specific videos that have helped me the most, but honestly, I have not viewed a single video, attended a webinar, or watched Jonathan live on Twitch without learning something. The area where I have improved the most is my ability to define my opponents’ ranges. While I have been aware of this for years, and have had access to Poker Stove, I just didn’t really look at it with a critical eye.  While I believe that I am far from making the best decisions possible, I know I have vastly improved in this essential area of decision making.
Since I only get to play a live game about once every two months, my opportunities to improve are limited. As a result, I treat this trip to Vegas as a vacation first, and a money-making opportunity second. While playing in the Colossus, I attempted to take notes as recommended by Jonathan, but since I have not practiced, I found that I was too slow. I also typed notes into the Note app on my phone, and later posted everything I had on Twitter.  I made many decisions based on reads, position, and stack sizes (mine and my opponents’).
Compared to my play before studying with Jonathan, I more frequently attacked a single limper and the blinds from late position, and I was rewarded for it.  Not only did I bag chips once, I bagged twice in the Colossus and when I got knocked out there were only 7 tables left.  I earned a 67th place finish for a payout of $14,330. Additionally, I jumped into a $50 last longer posted on 2+2 with 41 others and took it down for an additional $2,100. While in Vegas I also ran deep in two other tourneys, actually bagging chips in one, and was dramatically busted in both before the money.  Overall an amazing trip. This was the first time I had bagged chips since 2010, and it was my first WSOP cash.  Amazing, fantastic, and wonderful are the words that come to mind.
During the Colossus I experienced tremendous drama as I started with 5,000 chips, bagged 26,000 on Day 1c, then bagged 157,000 on Day 2, and amazingly made it up to 1.45 million chips during day three before I called a “shorty’s” all in with A-Jo and lost to his 3-3 leaving me with 997,000.  Then I played this hand and lost about 835,000 chips:
I have replayed that hand a lot in my mind.   Until last night I thought I was right to go with my read of his hand strength and try to make him fold.  Since we were down to so few players, maybe I should have considered that we were all guaranteed $10,000 and that he wasn’t folding any pair, or maybe my bet on the turned Q did not make sense if I had a Q, so his Ace kicker was good?   I just don’t know.  Should I have continued on the turn and checked the river with some thin show down value, or should I have check-shoved the turn, or just shoved the turn?   I was confident in my read that he did not have an over pair, and that he did not have a 9 or Q.  Post flop he was clearly uncomfortable, so 77 or 66 made sense, as did AKo, 65 suited+, AJ suited+.  I have no doubt he would have snapped it off if he had a Q on the turn, based on the few hands he had played.
((Jonathan’s comments: It seems like you got a bit fancy in this hand and it cost you. I would have certainly checked preflop. I can’t remember the last time I raised tiny over limps with the intention of trying to represent a premium hand after the flop. Most of the time, your opponents will not be capable of hand-reading well enough to remember what took place preflop.
Assuming you decided to reraise small preflop, I think your flop bet is great, both for value and protection. When you get called and the turn is a Queen, I think you should actually check-fold. It is way too likely that your opponent has a slowplayed 9, a straight, or top pair. Of course, he could also have an 8 or an underpair, but you are in fine shape versus most 8s and you beat the underpairs. I see no reason at all to play a big pot in this situation.
That being said, you mentioned you had a strong read on this player, but in general, I do not trust my reads enough to run a bluff for all of my chips with a hand that should have a reasonable amount of showdown value, especially if the pot checks down. If I bet the turn and got called, unless the board drastically changed on the river, I would have given up. Again, I am not a fan of running huge bluffs, especially in tournaments that are somewhat soft. Most of the time, it makes sense to just sit back and wait for prime situations where the money falls in your lap.))
In closing, I want to say “thank you” to Jonathan Little for his training and guidance.

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I am away on my honeymoon so this week’s blog post is a guest post by Pamela Maldonado, who is part of the editorial team at PokerNews. I hope you enjoy it. Let me know what you think!
In 2013 I played my first ever WSOP Event — the $1,000 Ladies tournament. It was a 3-day event with 954 entrants and I lasted a disappointing two hours.  Like many other players, I was eliminated by a bad beat.  I don’t like to complain so I’m not going to, but after the event was over I wasn’t as disappointed in the hand that sent me to the rail as I was in my play and outlook for the rest of that tournament.  Turns out I was a fish.
In retrospect it was the best thing that could have happened to me. I realized that even if I’d had good enough fortune to build a stack I wouldn’t have really known how to maneuver my stack for the remainder of the tournament. Fast forward to the summer of 2015 when I played two WSOP events, the Ladies $1,000 and the $777 Lucky Sevens event and it was a completely different story.
My second live tournament ever was the 2015 $1,000 Ladies Event.  I finished 83rd out of 795 entrants for my first tournament bubble. Then, a couple weeks later I entered my third live tournament where I finished 165th out of 4,422. Could there have been some run good in these two events? I’m sure there were spots, but I certainly didn’t run well for the entire events. This time around I had learned to build my stack even when I was not making hands.
How so? By doing a little bit of studying with Jonathan Little’s Secrets of Professional Tournament Poker series to be exact. Every time there’s been a poker boom there’s always been a good book or two that can help raise a player’s level of play. Problem is as the game changes over time it’s hard to get a grip on content that’s still relevant. Well in JL’s tournament series he doesn’t just recommend to play TAG or LAG. He teaches you how to adapt to almost any situation and that’s what so many players today struggle with.
Over the years NLH has become a tougher game to beat consistently because overall players have become more informed and as a result, better. That’s why you can’t rely on just one or two styles of play. Instead, you have to utilize all styles of play and know when and how to use them optimally. JL’s tips and secrets spread over three books have done wonders for my game.
In the first book he touches on some theory, bet sizing, exploitative ranges, and most importantly what weapons you have access to based on different stack sizes. This last bit is what was most effective in my improved play. As cash games are my usual bread and butter I’m mostly comfortable knowing how to play anywhere from 85BBs to 250BBs. In tournaments, you don’t get that luxury. In JL’s first volume he tells you what you can and can’t do based on your stack size. This is golden.
In Volume 2 he dedicates the entire book to the intangibles of poker that most players don’t appreciate or value.  He talks about concepts like stages of the tournament, mental and physical approach to the game, helpful tournament tips, and what it takes to go pro. At first glance, you may think, “these concepts are common sense, I can just skip it and go to the last volume,” but you’d be a fool to do so like I was.
In my last Lucky Sevens event where I went through a gigantic field, I completely neglected an important part of my game right before my 165th place exit and that was my physical conditioning. In a live event with thousands of players in the field you can be playing twelve-hour sessions for 3-4 consecutive days. I don’t know about you, but I don’t even put that many hours in for a regular cash game session. I completely undermined my nutrition, sleeping patterns, and endurance. So much so that within my final hours of play I had forgotten what the blinds were once, lost track of how many chips I had twice, and then finally got it in bad in a terrible spot I wouldn’t have otherwise had I not undermined my health. You’re leaving a lot of money on the table if you don’t take care of these things off the table so that you’re fully prepared to reap the benefits come game time.
Lastly, you’ll get to Volume 3 or what I like to call “Bringing It In.” At this point you’ve built a solid foundation that will prepare you for the 150 hands of analysis JL has recorded and explained in this last volume. This book is about building your intuition as a player so that when you get to the tables you can almost by nature know what direction you want to go within a hand and explain your reasoning behind it on every street.
I can’t thank Jonathan enough for the information he’s put into his tournament book series.  And if you’re truly interested in raising your game then you’ll not only buy these books, you’ll study them. I highlighted, marked, and took notes throughout the entire series. Moreover, I would watch one or two of his webinars he provides to his email subscribers just to really bring home the concepts that you’ve learned. At the end of it all, you’ll finally get closer to truly understanding what level your game is at and how to keep developing your skill by yourself and with others.

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ปอยเปต คาสิโน ออนไลน์
dgคาสิโน
ปอยเปต คาสิโน ออนไลน์
คาสิโนsa
คาสิโน sa

I am currently away on my honeymoon, so this week I will share with you a letter from Ken Adams, who I have helped with poker throughout he last few years. He walks us through a short cash game session he recently played. I think you will enjoy it. Let me know what you think! 
Recently I played a $2/$5 NLH session at my local card room that turned out to be much more profitable than it would have been before I joined  www.floattheturn.com and read your books.
Initially I was assigned to seat #8, where the previous tenant had gone broke.  I bought in for $500 – the maximum amount permitted.
The biggest stack (over $2,000) belonged to a 40-ish guy in seat #10.  He was opening (or raising) almost every hand, and betting relentlessly after the flop nearly every time.  (It was as though he was trying to channel Vanessa Selbst, the way she played five years ago.)  Most of the time he took down the pot uncontested, after the flop or on the turn.  Any time someone took him to the river, he put them all in.  So he was building big pots.  And he was winning enough of those to maintain his stack, though it fluctuated quite a bit.
After a while I picked up 8-8 in the lojack seat.  There were two limpers, and I opened for $30.  Seat 10 re-raised, which led the blinds and the limpers to fold.  I called, so I was heads up vs Seat 10, out of position.  The flop came K-7-5 rainbow.  I checked, knowing he would make a sizeable continuation bet, which he did.  I called, as his range included lots of hands I was beating.
The turn was a (K-7-5)-6, creating both a straight draw and a flush draw.  I checked, he made another big bet, and I check-raised all-in with my second pair and open-ended straight draw.  I wasn’t sure whether I wanted him to call or fold.  He called.  The river was an offsuit 2.  I tabled my 8-8 and when he mucked, his cards flashed slightly; it looked like he had A-7.
I doubled up against Seat 10 a second time when I opened in the hijack seat with Ah-9h and he called on the button, as did the Big Blind.  The flop came As-Th-4h.  The Big Blind checked, I bet, Seat 10 raised, the Big Blind folded and I called.  The turn was the (As-Th-4h)-9c.  I checked, expecting Seat 10 to bet, which he did.  I decided to call rather than raise, figuring that would maximize my chances of keeping him in the hand.  The river was the (As-Th-4h-9c)-2h!  I saw him look down at his chips in a way that appeared he was eager to bet.  So I checked again.  He bet, I check-raised all-in, he snap called and turned over the Kh-Jh!
In both hands I felt I was able to apply what I have learned from you, in terms of exploiting an opponent’s weaknesses.  This player’s tendencies were so extreme and obvious that it didn’t take me long to figure him out, and to exploit him.  No one else at the table appeared to be doing that.  They were waiting for big hands in hopes of trapping him.  But he was good enough to see that, and when they played back at him he folded unless he had a big hand.
After the second double up he slowed down against me.  Fortunately seat #2 opened up, and I was able to get position on him, which was beautiful, as I was able to get him to fold to my marginal hands when I needed to.  Basically, he stayed away from me while continuing to pound on the rest of the table.  Because he was in nearly every pot, I could pick my spots against him.  I don’t think I lost a single chip to him the entire session.
I ended up booking a $1,200 win in 3.5 hours of play, with most of it coming from Seat 10.  And he still had nearly $2,000 when I left to go home for dinner.  Basically he was taking money from the rest of the table, and giving it to me!  Sweeeeet!  I just wish it were always that easy.
Your advice has led me to change my game in many ways.  Some changes, like bet sizing, have been relatively easy to implement.  Others (like accurately putting opponents on a range of hands and narrowing their range as the hand progresses) continue to be more difficult for me.
It is easier to say “figure out each opponent’s tendencies and exploit their weaknesses” than it is to actually do it in real time.  But in this instance, the player in Seat 10 made it easy.  His style of play was so exaggerated, and so easy to exploit, that it seemed obvious rather quickly.  Then it was just a matter of waiting for the right opportunities and capturing them.
It remains to be seen whether I am able to do that as successfully with players whose tendencies and weaknesses are not as immediately obvious or exaggerated.  I expect it will take me a fair amount of time and practice, and that improvement will come only gradually since I don’t get to play all that often.  But if I can get into a game with the guy from Seat 10 every once in a while, it will give me encouragement to stick with it.
For an in-depth discussion on how to exploit the tendencies of most typical opponents you will encounter in the small stakes games, check out my best-selling book, Strategies for Beating Small Stakes Poker Tournaments. It is only 80 pages long but it is packed with actionable information that will instantly improve your game. I decided to make it as affordable as possible, so it is only $4.99. I hope you enjoy it. Let me know what you think! Be sure to check back next week at JonathanLittlePoker.com for another educational blog post. 

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ปอยเปต คาสิโน ออนไลน์
dgคาสิโน
ปอยเปต คาสิโน ออนไลน์
คาสิโนsa
คาสิโน sa

by Neil Blumenfield
When I made the 2015 WSOP Main Event November Nine at age 61 a big deal was made about age as the Final Table tends to be dominated by young male players.  2015 was especially significant because, while I was older than any previous final table player in the November Nine format, I was joined at this final table by 73-year-old Pierre Neuville, So discussions about age and poker became a big topic.  It had become common knowledge that due to the physical and mental challenge of playing seven full days of poker, that it had become a young person’s game, or, at least, the Main Event was to be forever dominated by players (presumably male) in their 20’s and 30’s.  Even I bought in to the folklore.  And it is true that it takes a long time to build a stack and one mistake, one lapse in concentration to lose it all.
While it is admittedly tougher to concentrate for 13 hours a day for seven days of poker at 60 than it was at 22, I am convinced that the skills, and especially the dedication, that players bring to the table are the key to success.  Do younger players enjoy more success because they can concentrate longer, get tired less or because they are just more prepared?
I have had the pleasure of meeting and befriending a lot of great young players.  They have two things in common: a great aptitude for the math of the game and an incredible dedication to working on their game.  There are abundant online tools to help analyze poker hands.  It used to be just PokerStove, but now there are dozens of powerful tools and the elite players work countless hours away from the table evaluating small nuances of playing a huge number of “interesting” hands.
When I started at Informix in my 20’s, I was unencumbered by life.  I was single, didn’t own a home, had no one and nothing to distract me from my job at Informix.  And the company was mostly like me.  Young, single, dedicated to success.  So we worked long hours and socialized with the people we worked with.  Outside the office, we talked about work.  We were always thinking about how we could do better, have more success.  This was a work environment that I would never come close to duplicating.  Part of it was timing, but a large part of it was changes in life.  Families, time doing homework, going to the kids’ games, work around the house, expanding social relationships – all distractions from absolute dedication to the job.  We started to talk negatively about the workaholics and positively about the need for work/life balance.
The young, elite poker players do not try to balance their lives.  They are almost universally single.  Some, not only have no mortgage, but no home.  They just travel the poker circuit.  Their lives are very unbalanced.  When they are not playing live, they are playing online, and when they are not playing, they are preparing.  The elite players have great skills.  They know the math of the game, but they are constantly analyzing play to improve their skills and to prepare for as many situations as possible in a game where the number of possible situations is close to infinite.  In poker, the game is dominated by the ones who work the hardest, ignore distractions and are tunnel focused on their job.  In business, success also goes to those who are most dedicated to the job at hand.  It has to be a conscious decision to be unbalanced, to dedicate your energy almost exclusively in one direction, and unfortunately, sacrificing anything else that constrains your ability to be the most prepared person at the table, be it a poker table or a conference table.
I am convinced that the Main Event is dominated by young players not because they have more stamina than older players, but just because they are in a time of their lives when they can and choose to work harder, avoid distractions and be more prepared when they sit down to play.  I know dozens of players in their twenties who spend dozens of hours every week, in addition to time playing, analyzing their game.  I know a lot of 50+ poker players.  One of them (Dave) works that hard.  So, I would suggest to those who say the young guys dominate because they are young, that, in fact, they dominate just because they work a lot harder at their game.
Between July and November last year, I had a very unique opportunity (and clear motivation) to work on my game.  I hired a great coach, Amir, spent 100’s of hours reading, analyzing hands, watching videos, taking notes, reviewing ideas and playing hands.  We also put together a stellar team of elite pros for four days of simulations.  We spent many hours developing a final table strategy.  While this was a special case, the reality is that the tools are there for anyone with motivation to dramatically improve their game, regardless of skill level, gender or age.  Explore the wealth of training material available and I will see you in July at the Rio, or maybe, in November.
For more from Neil, follow him on twitter @nrb1. If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your friends. Be sure to check back next week for another educational blog post. Thanks for reading!

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ปอยเปต คาสิโน ออนไลน์
dgคาสิโน
ปอยเปต คาสิโน ออนไลน์
คาสิโนsa
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ฉันเพิ่งเสร็จสิ้นบทสำหรับหนังสือ Mastering Small Stakes No-Limit Hold’em ที่กำลังจะมาถึงและฉันภูมิใจที่จะบอกว่ามันเต็มไปด้วยเคล็ดลับการดำเนินการสำหรับผู้เล่นเดิมพันรายย่อยที่ต้องการย้ายไปยังเดิมพันกลาง สิ่งนี้ทำให้ฉันคิดเกี่ยวกับสิ่งที่ผู้เชี่ยวชาญชั้นนำอื่น ๆ จะแนะนำฉันจึงถามพวกเขา ผู้เชี่ยวชาญเหล่านี้บางคนเป็นชื่อบ้านที่เป็นที่รู้จักในขณะที่คนอื่น ๆ ไม่ค่อยมีใครรู้จัก แต่ฉันหันไปหาใครเมื่อต้องการเรียนโป๊กเกอร์ นี่คือคำตอบของพวกเขาพร้อมความคิดเห็นของฉันด้านล่างเป็นตัวเอียง: Daniel Negreanu: ค้นหากลุ่มผู้เล่นที่คุณเคารพเกมและพูดคุยกับพวกเขาโดยเฉพาะผู้ที่เล่นเดิมพันที่คุณต้องการเล่นอยู่แล้ว JL: ฉันเห็นด้วยกับเรื่องนี้โดยสิ้นเชิง เมื่อฉันเริ่มเล่นครั้งแรกฉันอ่านหนังสือโป๊กเกอร์ทุกเล่มที่ฉันสามารถทำได้แม้ว่าสิ่งนี้จะทำให้ฉันดี แต่ฉันก็เริ่มเห็นการปรับปรุงอย่างมากก่อนที่ฉันจะเริ่มพูดคุยเกี่ยวกับโป๊กเกอร์กับผู้เล่นที่เอาชนะเกมปัจจุบันของฉัน ฉันมีฟอรัมฟรีบน FloatTheTurn.com ที่คุณสามารถพูดคุยเกี่ยวกับโป๊กเกอร์กับผู้เล่นที่ทำงานอย่างหนักเพื่อพัฒนาทักษะของพวกเขา เมื่อเร็ว ๆ นี้ฉันได้รับเกียรติในการพูดคุยเกี่ยวกับกลยุทธ์การเล่นโป๊กเกอร์กับ Daniel ในพอดคาสต์ Full Contact Poker ของเขา หากคุณยังไม่ได้ดำเนินการคุณสามารถตรวจสอบและแจ้งให้เราทราบว่าคุณคิดอย่างไร! Rob Tinnion: มุ่งเน้นไปที่พื้นฐาน เป็นพื้นฐานสำหรับเหตุผล เรียนรู้ที่จะเดินก่อนที่คุณจะวิ่ง … ตรวจสอบให้แน่ใจว่าคุณสามารถเอาชนะการเดิมพันปัจจุบันของคุณในช่วงที่เหมาะสมก่อนที่คุณจะพิจารณาเลื่อนขั้น การลดความสูญเสียของคุณมีความสำคัญพอ ๆ กันถ้าไม่สำคัญไปกว่าการเพิ่มผลกำไรให้สูงสุด JL: นี่เป็นคำแนะนำที่ยอดเยี่ยม ผู้เล่นอายุน้อยหลายคนเฝ้าดูผู้เล่นในรายการโป๊กเกอร์ที่ถ่ายทอดสดทางโทรทัศน์ที่ดำเนินการบลัฟขนาดใหญ่และคิดว่านั่นคือสิ่งที่พวกเขากำลังจะทำ ซึ่งมักส่งผลให้สแต็คจำนวนมากถูกเผาโดยไม่มีเหตุผลเลย หากคุณไม่ได้เล่นโป๊กเกอร์เพื่อสุขภาพขั้นพื้นฐานเป็นส่วนใหญ่คุณอาจทำพลาดครั้งสำคัญ Jon Van Fleet: มุ่งเน้นไปที่กระบวนการซึ่งหมายถึงการมุ่งเน้นไปที่สิ่งที่คุณสามารถควบคุมได้ศึกษา 25% และเล่น 75% และมีความคิดสร้างสรรค์ / เปิดใจกว้าง แนวคิดเหล่านี้คือสิ่งที่ฉันรับรู้ถึงความสำเร็จของฉัน JL: เห็นพ้องกันมากว่าการพัฒนากระบวนการศึกษาเป็นสิ่งสำคัญ ผู้เล่นหลายคนเพียงเห็นกระแสกระวนกระวายใจสัปดาห์ละครั้งและคิดว่าเพียงพอแล้วที่จะเล่นเกมได้ดี หากคุณต้องการประสบความสำเร็จคุณต้องมีส่วนร่วมกับโปรแกรมวิเคราะห์ต่างๆที่จะช่วยให้คุณเข้าใจว่าบทละครใดดีที่สุดและเพราะเหตุใด เมื่อฉันเริ่มเล่นครั้งแรกฉันศึกษาประมาณ 50% ของเวลาแม้ว่าจำนวนจะลดลงเมื่อเวลาผ่านไปเนื่องจากระดับทักษะโดยรวมของฉันเพิ่มขึ้น การใช้เวลาศึกษาอยู่ห่างจากโต๊ะเป็นจำนวนมากมีความสำคัญต่อความสำเร็จของคุณที่โต๊ะ เป็นสิ่งสำคัญเช่นกันที่คุณจะต้องคิดนอกกรอบ หากคุณคิดว่าสิ่งที่ทุกคนบอกคุณนั้นถูกต้องคุณจะพลาดโอกาสในการค้นหากลยุทธ์ที่สร้างสรรค์ที่เปิดประตูสู่ผลกำไรมหาศาล Michael Acevedo: เคล็ดลับที่ดีที่สุดของฉันคือการได้รับการฝึกสอนอย่างมืออาชีพจากคนที่กำลังเล่นเกมที่คุณต้องการเล่น การศึกษาวิดีโอโป๊กเกอร์และหนังสือเท่านั้นที่จะทำให้คุณได้รับหลาย ๆ ครั้งวิธีเดียวที่จะไปสู่ระดับต่อไปคือการหาคนที่เก่งมากในการประเมินเกมของคุณและบอกคุณว่าการรั่วไหลหลักของคุณคืออะไรและคุณจะแก้ไขได้อย่างไร พวกเขา JL: ตลอดอาชีพการงานของฉันฉันใช้จ่ายเงินไปกว่า 25,000 เหรียญในการฝึกสอนส่วนตัวและมองย้อนกลับไปฉันหวังว่าฉันจะใช้จ่ายให้มากกว่านี้ มีค่ามากมายในการจ่ายเงินให้ใครสักคนเพื่อเอาชนะเกมที่คุณต้องการเล่นในราคาที่สมเหตุสมผลเพื่อค้นหาข้อบกพร่องในกลยุทธ์ของคุณและบอกวิธีแก้ไข การฝึกสอนเป็นวิธีที่รวดเร็วในการประสบความสำเร็จในขณะที่ประสบการณ์ใช้เวลานานกว่ามาก Jesse Yaginuma: มีแผนและมีเหตุผลสำหรับทุกสิ่งที่คุณทำ เมื่อเดิมพันให้คิดว่าคุณกำลังเดิมพันด้วยเงินหรือบลัฟจากนั้นวางแผนว่าคุณจะตอบสนองต่อการกระทำของฝ่ายตรงข้ามอย่างไร วางแผนล่วงหน้าเพื่อให้คุณรู้ถึงการกระทำในอนาคตของตนเองก่อนที่จะเกิดขึ้น JL: หากคุณไม่มีแผนว่าทำไมคุณถึงเดิมพันหรือตรวจสอบคุณมักจะทำผิดพลาด หากคุณไม่สามารถเรียกมือที่แย่กว่านี้ออกไปได้เมื่อเดิมพันด้วยมูลค่าอาจเป็นการดีที่จะตรวจสอบ หากไม่พับด้วยมือที่ดีกว่าก็ไม่ควรทำบลัฟ แบรนดอนแช็ค – แฮร์ริส: สำหรับผู้เล่นแบบผสมเคล็ดลับ # 1 ของฉันอาจทำได้ง่ายๆเพียงแค่รอบรู้ในทุกเกม เมื่อพยายามก้าวไปข้างหน้าในบางรูปแบบฉันคิดว่าจุดสำคัญที่สุดคือการทำความเข้าใจความเท่าเทียมของคุณ (ในเกมแบบผสมโดยเฉพาะอย่าพับบ่อยเกินไป) และเรียนรู้ที่จะเล่นส่วนที่อ่อนแอที่สุดในซีรีส์ของคุณอย่างมีประสิทธิภาพ JL: ก่อนหน้านี้คุณสามารถเอาชนะเกมได้โดยการเดิมพันเมื่อคุณเช็คอิน ในการแข่งขันวันนี้มันจะไม่ได้ผลเช่นกันเพราะผู้เล่นทั่วไปได้เรียนรู้ว่าการโยนตัวบ่อยเกินไปนั้นเป็นอันตรายเพียงใด หากคุณพบว่าฝ่ายตรงข้ามมักทำให้คุณทุ่มด้วยการเดิมพันเล็กน้อยจำนวนมากคุณจะป้องกันได้ไม่ดีพอกับส่วนล่างของการเลือกของคุณ เบอร์นาร์ดลี: ตรวจสอบให้แน่ใจว่าคุณมีแบ๊งค์เพียงพอที่จะเลื่อนขึ้น การเล่นอย่างประหยัดมักจะทำให้เกิดการตัดสินใจที่ไม่ดี JL: ฉันเคยเห็นครั้งแล้วครั้งเล่าที่มีคนไปวิ่งได้ดีไม่ว่าจะในทัวร์นาเมนต์หรือเกมเงินสดย้ายไปเดิมพันที่พวกเขาไม่สบายใจจากนั้นก็เล่นต่อไปอย่างใกล้ชิดเกินไปและพยายามทำให้แน่ใจ พวกเขาได้รับเงินอย่างดีหรือเล่นเหมือนคนบ้าคลั่งที่ต้องการแสดงให้ฝ่ายตรงข้ามเดิมพันสูงซึ่งเป็นเจ้านาย ในความเป็นจริงคุณควรเล่นเกมมาตรฐานของคุณซึ่งนำไปสู่ความสำเร็จในอดีต หากคุณไม่ต้องกังวลว่าจะพังเพราะคุณได้รับการควบคุมอย่างเหมาะสมคุณสามารถเล่นต่อไปได้อย่างดีที่สุด ขอบคุณทุกคนที่ตอบคำถามนี้ ฉันรู้สึกทราบซึ้ง! ขออภัยทุกคนที่มีปัญหากับระบบตอบกลับ Google ฟอร์ม ฉันจะแก้ไขข้อบกพร่องก่อนครั้งต่อไป ฉันหวังว่าคุณจะสนุกกับเคล็ดลับเหล่านี้จากมือโปรชั้นนำสำหรับผู้เล่นที่มีเงินเดิมพันจำนวนน้อยที่ต้องการย้ายไปเล่นเกมขนาดกลาง หากคุณมีคำถามใด ๆ ที่ต้องการให้ฉันถามผู้เชี่ยวชาญชั้นนำในอนาคตโปรดแจ้งให้เราทราบในส่วนความคิดเห็นด้านล่าง หากคุณชอบโพสต์นี้คุณสามารถแบ่งปันกับเพื่อนของคุณ อย่าลืมกลับมาตรวจสอบในสัปดาห์หน้าสำหรับบล็อกโพสต์ด้านการศึกษาใหม่ ขอบคุณที่อ่าน! .

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โพสต์นี้เป็นส่วนเล็ก ๆ ของหนังสือทฤษฎีโป๊กเกอร์สมัยใหม่ที่กำลังจะมาถึงของ Michael Acevedo ฉันมีความสุขที่ได้เห็นสำเนาในช่วงต้นและยอดเยี่ยมมาก คุณจะไม่อยากพลาดหนังสือสุดแหวกแนวเล่มนี้! การแสวงหาประโยชน์แบบพาสซีฟเกม GTO สร้างรายได้จากผู้เล่นที่ไม่ดีหรือไม่? ในสถานการณ์ HU หากผู้เล่นเล่นกับคู่ต่อสู้ที่ไม่เหมาะสมที่สุดการเบี่ยงเบนใด ๆ ที่ผู้เล่นที่อ่อนแอกว่าทำจาก GTO ไปสู่กลยุทธ์ที่แย่กว่านั้นจะทำให้เขาเสียค่าใช้จ่ายเท่านั้นซึ่งผู้เล่นที่เหมาะสมที่สุดจะประสบความสำเร็จ ปรากฏการณ์นี้เรียกว่าการเอารัดเอาเปรียบแบบพาสซีฟเนื่องจากผู้เล่นที่ดีที่สุดไม่ต้องทำอะไรเลยนอกจากเล่นกลยุทธ์สมดุลเพื่อรับ Ev เพิ่มเติมจากผู้เล่นที่ไม่เหมาะสม การแสวงหาประโยชน์เชิงรุกการแสวงหาผลประโยชน์แบบแอคทีฟเกิดขึ้นเมื่อผู้เล่นเบี่ยงเบนจากกลยุทธ์หลักเพื่อใช้ประโยชน์จากการรั่วไหลของฝ่ายตรงข้าม กลยุทธ์การแสวงหาประโยชน์สูงสุด (MES): ตามที่อธิบายไว้ก่อนหน้านี้ MES เกิดขึ้นเมื่อผู้เล่นเลือกที่จะเบี่ยงเบนจากสมดุลไปสู่กลยุทธ์ที่เพิ่มประสิทธิภาพสูงสุดให้กับ Ev เทียบกับกลยุทธ์ขั้นต่ำของโรงเก็บของ (เป็นไปได้เฉพาะในกรณีที่คนร้ายไม่เล่น GTO ด้วยตัวเอง) ตัวอย่าง: พิจารณาสถานการณ์โป๊กเกอร์ที่เรียบง่ายดังต่อไปนี้: เล่น: ผู้เล่น HUSNG สามารถ Push of Fold เท่านั้น HUNLH, มู่ลี่ 0.5bb / 1bb กองที่มีประสิทธิภาพ = 15bb Preflop: สมบูรณ์ใน SB กลยุทธ์ GTO ของเขาคือการผลักดัน 45.7% ลองจินตนาการว่าฮีโร่วายร้ายแปดประเภทที่แตกต่างกันสามารถเผชิญหน้าได้ในการแข่งขันแบบเฮดอัพ: GTO Player: ผู้เล่นคนนี้จะเรียกแรงกดดัน 15bb SB ที่เหมาะสมที่สุดโดยมีช่วง 28.5% ผู้เล่นหลวม 10%: วายร้ายประเภทนี้ค่อนข้างเหนียวและเรียกแรงกดดัน 15bb SB ด้วยช่วง 31.4% ผู้เล่นหลวม 25%: วายร้ายประเภทนี้เหนียวกว่าเล็กน้อยและเรียกการพิมพ์ 15bb SB ด้วยช่วง 35.6% ผู้เล่นหลวม 100%: วายร้ายประเภทนี้เกลียดการพับและเรียกแรงกดดัน 15bb SB ด้วยระยะ 57% ผู้เล่นแน่น 10%: วายร้ายประเภทนี้เข้มงวดกว่าและเรียกแรงกดดัน 15bb SB ด้วยระยะ 25.7% ผู้เล่นแน่น 25%: วายร้ายประเภทนี้เข้มงวดกว่ามากและเรียกแรงกดดัน 15bb SB ด้วยระยะ 21.4% ผู้เล่นแน่น 50%: วายร้ายประเภทนี้มีจำนวนมากและเรียกแรงกดดัน 15bb SB ด้วยช่วง 14.3% ในตารางถัดไปเราสรุปการชนะ SB Ev โดยการเล่น GTO และ MES กับคู่ต่อสู้ต่างๆรวมถึงการสูญเสีย Ev ที่อาจเกิดขึ้นของฮีโร่หากคนร้ายเล่น GTO แทนกลยุทธ์ที่ไม่เหมาะสมหรือต่อต้านการแสวงหาประโยชน์จากฮีโร่ ดังที่แสดงในตารางเกม GTO ไม่สามารถแพ้หรือชนะผู้เล่น Ev เทียบกับผู้เล่น GTO เพิ่มเติมได้ แต่จะได้รับผู้เล่น Ev เทียบกับผู้เล่นที่ไม่เหมาะสมขึ้นอยู่กับระดับของการรั่วไหล MES ได้รับค่าเฉลี่ย 6.4 bb / 100 พิเศษเมื่อเทียบกับผู้เล่นระดับต่ำกว่า GTO แต่การทำเช่นนั้นทำให้เกิดการรั่วไหลในเกมของเราที่สามารถใช้ประโยชน์ได้โดยเฉลี่ยเมื่อเทียบกับ -15.62 bb / 100 แม้แต่กับคู่ต่อสู้ที่แย่มากที่โทรบ่อยขึ้น 2 เท่า มากกว่าที่ควรจะเป็น MES จับได้มากกว่า GTO 6.3bb / 100 เท่านั้นและสามารถใช้ประโยชน์ได้กลับไปที่ -2.5bb / 100 หากคนร้ายเรียกเข้มงวดกว่าที่ควรจะเป็น 50% MES จะทำได้ดีมากโดยให้มากกว่า GTO ถึง 24.6bb / 100 แต่สามารถใช้ประโยชน์จาก -62.4bb / 100 ได้อีกครั้งนอกจากนี้การเปลี่ยนแปลงกลยุทธ์ของเรานั้นรุนแรงอย่างไม่น่าเชื่อเนื่องจากตอนนี้เราผลัก 100% มือแทนที่จะเป็น 28% เพื่อให้ฝ่ายตรงข้ามที่มีสติสามารถมองเห็นการปรับการหาประโยชน์ของเราได้อย่างง่ายดาย MES มีความเสี่ยงเนื่องจากเราทำให้ตัวเองตกอยู่ในสถานการณ์ที่ฝ่ายตรงข้ามสามารถต่อต้านการใช้ประโยชน์จากกลยุทธ์ใหม่ของเราให้ได้กำไรมากกว่าที่เราพยายามใช้ประโยชน์จากเขาในตอนแรกหากเขารู้ว่าเรากำลังทำอะไรอยู่ นอกจากนี้หากเราทำผิดพลาดเมื่อพิจารณาการเล่นของคนร้าย (ซึ่งอาจเกิดขึ้นเป็นครั้งคราว) และปรับตัวไม่ถูกต้องเราจะเป็นคนที่เบี่ยงเบนจากกลยุทธ์ที่อ่อนแอกว่าซึ่งจะสูญเสียคุณค่าของเราไปและดังนั้น เราต้องระมัดระวังและมีความปลอดภัยระดับสูงในการอ่านของเราหากเราใช้ประโยชน์สูงสุด หากคุณชอบบทความนี้คุณสามารถสั่งซื้อ Modern Poker Theory ล่วงหน้าได้แล้วหนังสือหรือ ebook ทางกายภาพจะถูกส่งถึงคุณทันทีที่เผยแพร่ ขอบคุณที่อ่าน! อย่าลืมกลับมาตรวจสอบในสัปดาห์หน้าสำหรับบล็อกโพสต์ด้านการศึกษาใหม่

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